Muscles are what keeps our metabolism high and as we age, our muscles slowly start to get smaller, therefore allowing our metabolism to slow down. To counteract this, Shapiro recommends that we start lifting weights. “No, you won’t get big and bulky. In fact, you’ll stay lean,” she says. That’s because weight training causes you to burn more calories per workout than cardio sessions, and you continue to burn them post workout. And that’s not all—click here to discover 40 Ways to Lose 4 Inches of Body Fat!
You need to eat less. It doesn't matter if all you eat is grilled chicken, brown rice, and broccoli. If you don't cut back on your portions, you won't lose weight. Everyone's calorie needs are different, but in general, a woman eating 2,000 calories per day should aim to cut back by 400 to 500 calories, recommends Frances Largeman-Roth, RDN, nutrition expert and author of Eating in Color. (These 5 simple ways to cut 500 calories can help.)
SOURCES: Fred Pescatore, MD author, The Hamptons Diet; and medical director, partners of integrative medicine. Samantha Heller, MS, RD, senior clinical nutritionist and exercise physiologist, New York University Medical Center, New York City. Victoria Shanta-Retelny, RD, Northwestern Memorial Hospital's Wellness Institute, Chicago. Rachel Beller, director, Brander Nutritional Oncology Counseling and Research Program, John Wayne Cancer Institute, Santa Monica, Calif. Yoga for Weight Loss & Belly Fat, Complete Beginners Fat Burning Workout at Home, Exercise Routine
At the Cut we’re both fascinated and disturbed by the lengths celebrities will go to look the way they do: We’ve analyzed the science behind Pippa Middleton’s SirtFood diet, discovered that Jennifer Aniston considers kale chips a cheat-day snack, and balked at the fact that Kate Bosworth’s only indulgence is ketchup. We’ve also tried many celebrity diets ourselves. Our own Rebecca Harrington has attempted to eat like Beyoncé, Rihanna, and Taylor Swift — all in the name of journalism. Here, for your reading pleasure, is a guide to what we’ve learned along the way.

The cabbage soup diet? Really? Just no. Restricting calories and losing body fat too quickly can wreak havoc on insulin, leptin, ghrelin and other hormones, prompting a surge in hunger and a slump in metabolism. These effects can last for more than a year, even after the diet is abandoned, according to a 2011 study in the New England Journal of Medicine. Yo-yo diets also prompt decline in dopamine, which means you’re left feeling unmotivated and sluggish. Make sure you’re not also guilty of any of these 25 Things You Do That Slow Your Metabolism.
In our 20s, we might be keeping a keen eye on the thermostat for financial reasons. When we’re in our 40s, we’re usually in a better financial situation. But being less frugal might actually contribute to your paunch. A striking new study published in the journal Diabetes suggests that simply turning down the heat in winter may help us attack belly fat while we sleep. Colder temperatures subtly enhance the effectiveness of our stores of brown fat—fat that keeps you warm by helping you burn through the fat stored in your belly.

getting fat over the years


I am a 58 year old female and weigh exactly the same as I did at 16. I have always had a huge appetite and I still eat as much as the children and the men in the family. I have always exercised (I am a marathon runner) but have not found any of the scare stories to be true – I have not accumulated belly fat and my metabolism has not slowed down. I think these articles can be misleading and cause unnecessary worry about the ageing process.
23. You’re a serial yo-yo dieter – (this was me!) – you’re on the vicious diet treadmill. You’ve done every diet going. You lose weight initially, feel great, finish the diet, and pile it back on again (and some more). We know these diets don’t really work, but each new one has so much promise! And you’ll be more disciplined next time? It’s not about will power though – when you deprive your body of calories, healthy fat, protein or nutrients, it will go into survival mode, trying to protect you. That means your cortisol will rise, your cravings kick in and your metabolism will crash (see no 1, 2, and 20!).
In late August 2018, the 61-year-old former Today show anchor posted on her Instagram Stories that a week into the diet she did "feel better" but hinted that she'd experienced some symptoms of the keto flu, Women's Health reports. "The fourth or fifth day, I felt a little shaky and headachy, but I feel much better," Couric said on Instagram. Suffice it to say, the mother of two is enjoying incorporating more fat into her diet. "I'm eating mostly protein and some cheese," she said. "And I'm putting half-and-half in my iced coffee, and I gotta tell ya, it's damn good."

Here’s how to rock a Wild Workout: Warm up with light cardio, mobility, and dynamic stretching (at least 60 seconds).  Work out and get your blood pumping for 20 seconds, followed by 10 seconds of rest.  Repeat 10 times for a total of 5 minutes. You can do simple exercises like jumping rope or pedaling as hard as you can on a stationary bike. If you’re more athletic, try burpees or hill-sprints.  Do whatever full-body movement is best for you—but do it as hard as you can and don’t forget the 10 second rests (hint: if you’re doing it right, you definitely won’t forget to rest between sets!). 
Capsacian, a molecule found in spicy chiles, has been shown to raise body temperature and speed up fat loss — although only temporarily, and only by a small percentage. Celi says there’s also some evidence that chemicals called isothiocyanates, which are present in pungent foods like spicy mustard, wasabi, and horseradish, may help activate brown fat and speed up metabolic rate. Bloody Mary, anyone?
Although it’s true that egg whites are low in calories, fat-free, and contain most of the protein found in an egg, eating the entire egg is beneficial to your metabolism. The yolk contains many metabolism-stoking nutrients, including fat-soluble vitamins, essential fatty acids and—most significantly—choline, a powerful compound that attacks the gene mechanism that triggers your body to store fat around your liver. Worried about cholesterol? New studies have found that moderate consumption of two whole eggs per day has no negative effect on a person’s lipid (fat) profile and may actually improve it.
Are menopausal changes affecting your weight? Many women struggle with weight loss before, during, and sometimes even long after menopause. Weight gain at this time may be related to changes in your hormones. But this is also a time when many women make changes to their daily routines that may affect their weight. For example, after the kids leave home some women are not as busy during the day with non-exercise physical activities like carrying groceries, lifting laundry baskets and other household chores. Evaluate your lifestyle to make sure that a change in your daily habits isn’t affecting your weight.

weight loss after 40 before and after


Gluten-free breads and other products are fooling you with their healthy-looking labels. Studies show that gluten-free replacements of foods that normally contain the protein are not healthier than the real thing — and they’re more expensive. Often, these breads have significantly less fiber than bread made with real whole wheat. As you get older, fiber is one of the nutrients you need the most. It keeps you full and ensures that your digestion keeps moving regularly.
Getting enough fiber is key to aging well and staying slim. Fiber not only helps keep you full so you can keep your portions in check, but it also helps lower cholesterol levels and keeps digestive system healthy. Several studies have found that increasing fiber intake by eating more whole grains can reduce your total and bad, LDL cholesterol levels, lower your risk for type 2 diabetes and heart disease, and help control your weight. That’s significant considering that heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, meaning the best diets for women are packed with fiber. Fiber can be found in whole grains like barley, brown rice, quinoa, oats, bulgur, millet, buckwheat, oat and wheat bran, and more. Fruits and vegetables are also great sources of fiber, as are many plant-based protein sources like beans and lentils. And here are 30 ways to get more fiber in your diet without even trying. Women: Why Do I Gain Weight In My 40's and 50's?

Jack Yeager, a nutrition coach in Los Angeles spends much of his time getting celebrities into shape. In fact, Yaeger recently hosted the Discovery network's "Body Challenge Hollywood," a 12-week health and fitness challenge starring such actors as Erik Estrada (CHiPs), Charlene Tilton (Dallas), Susan Olsen and Christopher Knight (both from The Brady Bunch), Kym Whitley (Sparks), and David Anthony Higgins (Malcolm in the Middle).


Your go-to fast food joints achieve perfectly crispy fries by frying the spuds in oil that has been reused over and over again. A study in the Canadian Journal of Dietetic Practice and Research found that heating oil to the smoking point during stir-frying may decrease the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids because of oxidative degradation. Those are the heart-healthy fats that nourish your skin and joints. Instead of grabbing a bag of fries at the drive-thru, opt for baking your own at home with a brush of olive oil and fresh herbs.

weight after 40


"The main culprit that slows metabolism and often leads to yo-yo dieting is what I call shrinking muscle syndrome," says Caroline Apovian, MD, director of the Nutrition and Weight Management Center at Boston Medical Center and the author of The Overnight Diet: The Proven Plan for Fast and Permanent Weight Loss. Starting at age 30, most people begin to lose about half a pound of the metabolism-revving tissue each year. Poof! Gone, just like that. And at age 50, the rate doubles. "The average sedentary woman may have lost nearly 15 pounds of muscle by the time she reaches her late 50s, a change that could cause her to gain nearly the same amount in body fat," says Wayne Westcott, PhD, a Prevention advisory board member and the director of fitness research at Quincy College in Massachusetts.

what causes belly fat in females over 40

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