Getting a good night’s sleep is one of life’s greatest pleasures, and also a surprisingly effective means of slimming down. The results of the Nurses’ Health Study reveal that, among a group of 60,000 women studied for 16 years, those who got 5 hours of sleep or less at night increased their risk of becoming obese by 15 percent. Getting adequate rest can also reduce your risk of dementia, according to researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Luckily, you’ll be heading off to the Land of Nod in no time once you learn the 20 Ways to Double Your Sleep Quality!
So I resolve to be sane and good to myself and I formulate another plan: I will try and make exercise a priority. I will keep eating lots of fresh fruits and vegetables. I will strive to eat when I'm hungry and stop when I'm full. I will choose foods that make me feel the best, physically and mentally, and avoid the ones that don't (read: My Number One Trick For Eating Right). I will enjoy the foods that life has to offer, including but not limited to crusty, home baked bread and a scoop of mint chocolate chip on a hot day. I will occasionally overdo it, but won't beat myself up. I'll stop wishing for the metabolism of a 25-year-old and start feeling grateful for the rich, full life of a 43-year-old.
While meat packs a lot of protein in one shot, getting your protein only from animal sources could actually speed muscle loss, according to a 2012 review by the International Osteoporosis Foundation Nutrition Working Group. Why? Meats, as well as grains like wheat and corn, are acid-producing foods that stunt muscle-protein synthesis. The good news: Fruits and vegetables are alkalizing and can help offset some of the muscle-robbing effects of meaty, starchy meals. "Plus, there are a lot of delicious vegetarian sources of protein," says Dr. Gerbstadt. "Try experimenting with tofu, lentils, or beans. They taste great and tend to be lower in calories." When you opt for animal protein, avoid high-fat sources such as regular ground beef, bacon, whole milk, or full-fat cheese.

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Nope, we’re not just talking about Pinterest-y D.I.Y. decor tips. Some of the healthiest food trends out there right now suggest using mason jars—namely, mason jar salads and overnight oats. While eating salads or oats out of a mason jar may make you feel good, it’s what you put in them that will make you look good—and earn you a flat stomach. We aren’t saying you have to toss out your Tupperware; we’re just saying you might beat boredom and find slimming down all that much easier.
It isn’t so much the metabolism slowing in my 50’s as it is the bad habits associated with youth. A box of Mac and Cheese was not a bad choice when competitive and highly active, I needed the carbs. But the mindset that a full box is a single sized serving remains despite the slow down in activity and metabolism. That’s where the real challenge lies. Too many years of eating rabbit food only after it was processed into a rabbit (or steer preferrably) with potato or corn as the only acceptable vegetable. 

ideal weight for 45 year old female

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