Speaking of social media, it’s time to take a cue from those iPhone-crazy millennials because it might just be the weight loss boost you want! Here’s what’s up: Holding onto that food memory may help you eat less at breakfast. And lunch, and dinner. An analysis on a number of “attentive eating” studies printed in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition showed that if people recall their last meal as being filling and satisfying, they tend to eat less during their next meal. Researchers found techniques like writing down or drawing meals (and even keeping food wrappers and receipts!) to be particularly beneficial.

Men and women who consumed a postexercise protein drink gained more metabolism-revving muscle mass and lost 50% more body fat than those who didn't refuel after working out, found a study published in Fitness Management. "For about 30 minutes after exercise, muscles are especially receptive to amino acids," says Wayne Westcott, PhD, the lead study author. "The combo we used—about 24 g of protein and 36 g of carbs—helps speed muscle repair and growth. As long as you eat close to 20 g of protein and 30 g of carbs, you'll get similar results." Enjoy this snack—or something similar—soon after exercise.
If you really hate regular milk — or have some other aversion to eating dairy — by all means, drink almond milk. It’s a perfectly healthy staple to keep around the house and add to your smoothies, pour over cereal, or just drink plain. However, if you’re drinking it because you think it’s healthier, there’s no need. Firstly, it’s not the healthiest plant-based milk at the store. And secondly, cow’s milk has much more calcium than almond milk. After 40, you really need calcium. It’s essential for your body to perform muscle contraction, nerve and heart functioning, and other biochemical reactions. If you don’t get enough calcium from your diet, your body starts taking calcium from your bones — that’s no good if you want them to stay strong well into your golden years.
Even if stressful situations don’t cause you to binge on fatty foods, your body may take longer to process any calories that you do eat. In a 2014 study from Ohio State University, women who reported being stressed out over a 24-hour span burned, on average, 104 fewer calories after they ate a meal of eggs, sausage and biscuits. The researchers point out that over the course of a year, this deficit could translate to an 11-pound weight gain.
If you're like many women over 40, you've probably noticed that it's become a lot easier to gain a few pounds than to lose them. The foods that you ate without care in your 20s and 30s now stick to your body like glue, adding bulk to your midsection. The good news: The solution to a slim, firm body at 40-plus is no farther than your fridge. Research shows that, when combined with a little regular exercise, what you eat and when you eat it are your metabolic secret weapons for building muscle mass, the body's prime calorie-burning tissue and a key driver of your metabolism.

Most celebrities (and unfortunately, even us common folk) frequently drop weight by following unrealistic plans and by cutting out favorite foods. But why would you ever want to cut love out of your life in any form? The key to successful, long-term weight loss and maintenance is learning how to shift your priorities and still include foods you love, but make the majority of your foods those that will also make you love the way you look and feel. A diet should never be like a light bulb that you turn on and off. Like anything else in life, balance is the goal, not black-and-white thinking.
“By the time women get to their 40s, they’ve hopefully given up the notion that happiness exists within a certain shape or size,” says Stacey Rosenfeld, Ph.D., a psychologist and author of Does Every Woman Have an Eating Disorder? Challenging Our Nation’s Fixation with Food and Weight. “Instead, they find fulfillment through their connections and their work, their passions and their families.” But if reasonable weight-loss is your goal, follow these 20 Science-Backed Ways to Motivate Yourself to Get in Shape.  

how to lose weight after 40 years old


You lose muscle mass as you age, which decreases your metabolism, but you can offset that decline by strength training every major muscle group at least two times per week. Putting these habits into place now, in your 40s, means you'll not only lose the weight at a reasonably quick rate, but you'll stay healthy, strong and lean into your later years, too.
You might want to think twice before ditching dairy if you’re trying to lose weight—despite what your Paleo-preaching CrossFit friends tell you. Cheese is a satisfying, portable, and inexpensive food that’s packed with calcium, vitamin D, and protein. “Calcium can also promote weight loss because it helps maintain muscle mass, which boosts and helps maintain metabolism, helping you burn calories more efficiently throughout the day,” says Tanya Zuckerbrot, RD, author of The Miracle Carb Diet: Make Calories & Fat Disappear—With Fiber! That doesn’t mean you can help yourself to a cheese-drenched casserole, though. Work cheese into fiber-rich snacks to make them more satiating.

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